Ann Arbor Classic Bike Show & Swap Meet, Day 79, 2015.

3F79 ‘17

Over and out: 3F79 is over and it was a bust. I now teach at least two days a week and in view of that responsibility along with other demands on my time I thought I’d better modify 2017 version. So the goal was at least 79 miles per week for 11 weeks. That would be 77 days; close enough to 79. Couldn’t do it. Lots of reasons. Won’t bore you with details. How bad was 2017? Here are the ‘17 stats with ‘16 stats in parentheses. Note that 2016 was not an especially good year for 3F79. Ride time: 44:53 (110:01). Miles: 549.4 (1,107.1). Feet of climbing 22,874 (70,396). 3F79 ‘17 stunk. I’d like for the rest of the year to not stink but man, life seems complicated these days. I’ll let you know how it goes. I’ll update this site. You can also stay current by visiting the Born2Roam Facebook page. Summary: I kick off my riding season the First Friday in February and ride for 79 consecutive days, hence 3F79. I did my first 3F79 in 2005. Photos: On this Facebook album. I try to mix in some cool destinations and events, such as the Ann Arbor Classic Bicycle Show & Swap Meet. I attended that show in 2015 and completed my 79 days by riding at nearby Pinckney Recreation Area. Why 79 days? I do 79-regimens from time-to-time to honor my father’s memory. He was 79 when he passed away on December 13, 1999. They’re not always about bikes. I’ve done 79-day stints of mixed recreation, yoga, Bible study; one year I sent e-cards to military personnel in the Middle East for 79 days through an online service. This year’s different because of changes to my schedule. I’m not riding every day. My goal is 79 miles per week for 11 weeks, the closest I could get to 79 days. Last year I averaged 97 miles per week. This year’s lower miles per week should help me include more MTB miles, which is one of my goals. Also changed: I won’t post pix to Facebook from each day’s ride. Instead I’ll post several photos from a few rides. You’ll find that Facebook album here; follow me to know when new images go up. When I ride an actual route (as opposed to just putzing around on my bike) I’ll post links on my RideWithGPS and Garmin Connect accounts.

February 3, 2017

Great Miami River Trail and Good Sam RV Show near Dayton, Ohio I rode the Great Miami River Trail north from Taylorsville MetroPark. I saw a sign leading to singletrack labeled “Buckeye Trail.” I took it, but that trail quickly dwindled off in a flood plain. I doubled back and turned onto the “Tadmor Trail,” which takes you through the heart of what once was a bustling center of commerce. A buddy who lives in Dayton said he’d been told that’s not legally an MTB trail but the sign didn’t say so; I’ll plead ignorance. The Tadmor Trail was closed just a few miles after the start for “hazardous conditions,” according to the sign. I rode the paved Great Miami River Trail out a ways and then back to the truck. I’d have ridden longer than the 10 miles I got but I was eager to get to the nearby RV show in time for a seminar on “Preparing to Full-Time.” The thought has always appealed to me and the seminar was free, so why not? In addition to the free seminars (I also attended one for those who want to work while traveling), parking was free and admission was just five dollars with my Good Sam membership card. The show itself was a tiny fraction the size of the massive boat, sport and travel shows in Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Louisville. Way easier to navigate and I could actually get inside trailers I found interesting. I don’t know if Howard and Linda Payne will continue doing the seminars at these shows or even if Good Sam will continue to produce shows, but I had a great time at this one and learned a ton. All in all a good start to this year’s 3F79.

February 10, 2017

Bernheim Arboretum, and Talbott Tavern, both just south of Louisville, Kentucky Bernheim is often in the Louisville news because there are tons of events there. Basically it’s 1,500 privately-owned acres committed to education about all things green. We started with lunch at Isaac’s Café and it was wonderful. I did several rides within the property, all on paved roads. The climb to the fire tower is a good workout. There are loops to Ten Toms and Guerrilla Hollow. I did laps of the main loop consisting of Visitor Center Drive and Arboretum Way, each lap a little under 3 miles long. A bike is a great way to explore the property, but I wouldn’t come here just to ride. We’ll go back and hike; I’ll climb the fire tower. I also rode the hike/bike trail, which is great use of a sliver of land Bernheim owns on the north side of 245. It has some gravel, lots of pavement (mostly closed roads), and runs near enough to 245 that traffic noise can be intrusive in spots. But it’s scenic, fairly flat, and easy. As with the road riding, I wouldn’t come here just to ride the hike/bike trail, but I’m glad I did it once and would consider doing it again. It’s about 7.8 miles out-and-back. Google maps suggests you can ride to the trailhead from inside the main part of the property, but their maintenance yard blocks the way. You might be able to work your way through, but I’d suggest parking at the west trailhead in the shadow of the Jim Beam distillery. There’s parking at the east trailhead, but that’s just a pull-off for a few cars whereas the west trailhead has a real, off-street parking area. We concluded with dinner at Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky. The building dates to 1779 and oozes charm. Service was good and prices were reasonable, but our entrées were only okay. Our desserts, however were wonderful. There are a ton of historic buildings in Bardstown and it seems half of them offer meals; we’ll pick someplace else next time. You may have better luck at Talbott; not everyone does fish properly and if you order something else you may find it very good. But we certainly recommend coffee and dessert.

February 15, 2017

Lick Creek Trail on the Hoosier National Forest south of Paoli, Indiana I ride the Hoosier all winter because I don’t worry about damaging the trails when they’re wet or during freeze/thaw cycles. My Surly Moonlander fatbike is perfect for this. Why don’t I worry? Because the trails are hardened for horse use and because in many places the damage has already been done due to poor trail design, especially fall line sections. Lick Creek used to be unrideable in winter; the native soil is super greasy when wet. It stays wet nearly all winter and most of the spring. But the HNF has gravelled most of the trail and the issue is resolved. Lick Creek is a short trail at 7.7 miles; I got 11.9 miles with some doubling back for photos. There’s not a lot of climbing; I got 234 feet of ascending. I ride the trail counterclockwise so I can climb the little rock garden that comes near the midway point. Another cool feature is the Roberts & Thomas Cemetery that is accessed via a spur. It’s about all that remains of an African-American community settled in 1820. The Lick Creek African-American Settlement grew to its largest size of 1,557 acres by 1855. Despite the name, it was a racially integrated community. Navigation is easy. There is a main trail that is wide and mostly gravel and a second, smaller loop that is singletrack on natural surface. The only potentially tricky part is getting back to the trailhead. Riding counterclockwise will bring to a spur to the right that goes to a secondary parking area on Grease Gravy Road. It’s signed but it’s wide and you may veer onto it if you aren’t attentive. Instead, continue on the main loop for about another half-mile to get to the trail leading back to the main parking area. As of this ride, the HNF is still using the Mountain Bike Recreational Opportunity Guide I wrote for them in May, 2003. Not sure how much longer they’ll use it. I offered to update it last year but they weren’t interested. Riding the Hoosier requires purchase of a trail tag. The photo shows me purchasing the first MTB trail tag from then-recreation manager Les Wadzinski. I can’t remember the year. Maybe 1998.

February 17, 2017

Little Miami Trail, starting in Loveland, Ohio (northeast of Cincinnati) As rail-trails go, this one’s only okay. But it’s a good place to ride together and Loveland is a nice little burg. We enjoyed the day very much. Oh, the Little Miami Trail is also where Julie rode her first century. It stands, I believe, as her only century. She and I rode south from Nisbet Park in Loveland and then doubled back to get the 13.13 miles she wanted. I erred a bit and we ended up with 13.18. Then I rode north on an out-and-back to end my day with 44.2 total miles. There are a few interesting sites along the trail, perhaps most interesting of which is the Peters Cartridge Company. Remediation was completed last year, opening the door for adaptive reuse and development into retail and condos. That would be amazing. This story in the Cincinnati Enquirer  has a good overview.
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Benton Springs overlook from 3F79 16.
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Millennium Trail at Bernheim.
Buying trail tag #1.
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© All content, including images, copyright R Ries Corporation unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.

3F79 ‘17

Over and out: 3F79 is over and it was a bust. I now teach at least two days a week and in view of that responsibility along with other demands on my time I thought I’d better modify 2017 version. So the goal was at least 79 miles per week for 11 weeks. That would be 77 days; close enough to 79. Couldn’t do it. Lots of reasons. Won’t bore you with details. How bad was 2017? Here are the ‘17 stats with ‘16 stats in parentheses. Note that 2016 was not an especially good year for 3F79. Ride time: 44:53 (110:01). Miles: 549.4 (1,107.1). Feet of climbing 22,874 (70,396). 3F79 ‘17 stunk. I’d like for the rest of the year to not stink but man, life seems complicated these days. I’ll let you know how it goes. I’ll update this site. You can also stay current by visiting the Born2Roam Facebook page. Summary: I kick off my riding season the First Friday in February and ride for 79 consecutive days, hence 3F79. I did my first 3F79 in 2005. Photos: On this Facebook album. I try to mix in some cool destinations and events, such as the Ann Arbor Classic Bicycle Show & Swap Meet. I attended that show in 2015 and completed my 79 days by riding at nearby Pinckney Recreation Area. Why 79 days? I do 79-regimens from time-to-time to honor my father’s memory. He was 79 when he passed away on December 13, 1999. They’re not always about bikes. I’ve done 79-day stints of mixed recreation, yoga, Bible study; one year I sent e- cards to military personnel in the Middle East for 79 days through an online service. This year’s different because of changes to my schedule. I’m not riding every day. My goal is 79 miles per week for 11 weeks, the closest I could get to 79 days. Last year I averaged 97 miles per week. This year’s lower miles per week should help me include more MTB miles, which is one of my goals. Also changed: I won’t post pix to Facebook from each day’s ride. Instead I’ll post several photos from a few rides. You’ll find that Facebook album here; follow me to know when new images go up. When I ride an actual route (as opposed to just putzing around on my bike) I’ll post links on my RideWithGPS and Garmin Connect accounts.

February 3, 2017

Great Miami River Trail and Good Sam RV Show near Dayton, Ohio I rode the Great Miami River Trail north from Taylorsville MetroPark. I saw a sign leading to singletrack labeled “Buckeye Trail.” I took it, but that trail quickly dwindled off in a flood plain. I doubled back and turned onto the “Tadmor Trail,” which takes you through the heart of what once was a bustling center of commerce. A buddy who lives in Dayton said he’d been told that’s not legally an MTB trail but the sign didn’t say so; I’ll plead ignorance. The Tadmor Trail was closed just a few miles after the start for “hazardous conditions,” according to the sign. I rode the paved Great Miami River Trail out a ways and then back to the truck. I’d have ridden longer than the 10 miles I got but I was eager to get to the nearby RV show in time for a seminar on “Preparing to Full-Time.” The thought has always appealed to me and the seminar was free, so why not? In addition to the free seminars (I also attended one for those who want to work while traveling), parking was free and admission was just five dollars with my Good Sam membership card. The show itself was a tiny fraction the size of the massive boat, sport and travel shows in Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Louisville. Way easier to navigate and I could actually get inside trailers I found interesting. I don’t know if Howard and Linda Payne will continue doing the seminars at these shows or even if Good Sam will continue to produce shows, but I had a great time at this one and learned a ton. All in all a good start to this year’s 3F79.

February 10, 2017

Bernheim Arboretum, and Talbott Tavern, both just south of Louisville, Kentucky Bernheim is often in the Louisville news because there are tons of events there. Basically it’s 1,500 privately-owned acres committed to education about all things green. We started with lunch at Isaac’s Café and it was wonderful. I did several rides within the property, all on paved roads. The climb to the fire tower is a good workout. There are loops to Ten Toms and Guerrilla Hollow. I did laps of the main loop consisting of Visitor Center Drive and Arboretum Way, each lap a little under 3 miles long. A bike is a great way to explore the property, but I wouldn’t come here just to ride. We’ll go back and hike; I’ll climb the fire tower. I also rode the hike/bike trail, which is great use of a sliver of land Bernheim owns on the north side of 245. It has some gravel, lots of pavement (mostly closed roads), and runs near enough to 245 that traffic noise can be intrusive in spots. But it’s scenic, fairly flat, and easy. As with the road riding, I wouldn’t come here just to ride the hike/bike trail, but I’m glad I did it once and would consider doing it again. It’s about 7.8 miles out-and-back. Google maps suggests you can ride to the trailhead from inside the main part of the property, but their maintenance yard blocks the way. You might be able to work your way through, but I’d suggest parking at the west trailhead in the shadow of the Jim Beam distillery. There’s parking at the east trailhead, but that’s just a pull-off for a few cars whereas the west trailhead has a real, off-street parking area. We concluded with dinner at Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Kentucky. The building dates to 1779 and oozes charm. Service was good and prices were reasonable, but our entrées were only okay. Our desserts, however were wonderful. There are a ton of historic buildings in Bardstown and it seems half of them offer meals; we’ll pick someplace else next time. You may have better luck at Talbott; not everyone does fish properly and if you order something else you may find it very good. But we certainly recommend coffee and dessert.

February 15, 2017

Lick Creek Trail on the Hoosier National Forest  south of Paoli, Indiana I ride the Hoosier all winter because I don’t worry about damaging the trails when they’re wet or during freeze/thaw cycles. My Surly Moonlander fatbike is perfect for this. Why don’t I worry? Because the trails are hardened for horse use and because in many places the damage has already been done due to poor trail design, especially fall line sections. Lick Creek used to be unrideable in winter; the native soil is super greasy when wet. It stays wet nearly all winter and most of the spring. But the HNF has gravelled most of the trail and the issue is resolved. Lick Creek is a short trail at 7.7 miles; I got 11.9 miles with some doubling back for photos. There’s not a lot of climbing; I got 234 feet of ascending. I ride the trail counterclockwise so I can climb the little rock garden that comes near the midway point. Another cool feature is the Roberts & Thomas Cemetery that is accessed via a spur. It’s about all that remains of an African-American community settled in 1820. The Lick Creek African-American Settlement grew to its largest size of 1,557 acres by 1855. Despite the name, it was a racially integrated community. Navigation is easy. There is a main trail that is wide and mostly gravel and a second, smaller loop that is singletrack on natural surface. The only potentially tricky part is getting back to the trailhead. Riding counterclockwise will bring to a spur to the right that goes to a secondary parking area on Grease Gravy Road. It’s signed but it’s wide and you may veer onto it if you aren’t attentive. Instead, continue on the main loop for about another half- mile to get to the trail leading back to the main parking area. As of this ride, the HNF is still using the Mountain Bike Recreational Opportunity Guide I wrote for them in May, 2003. Not sure how much longer they’ll use it. I offered to update it last year but they weren’t interested. Riding the Hoosier requires purchase of a trail tag. The photo shows me purchasing the first MTB trail tag from then-recreation manager Les Wadzinski. I can’t remember the year. Maybe 1998.

February 17, 2017

Little Miami Trail, starting in Loveland, Ohio  (northeast of Cincinnati) As rail-trails go, this one’s only okay. But it’s a good place to ride together and Loveland is a nice little burg. We enjoyed the day very much. Oh, the Little Miami Trail is also where Julie rode her first century. It stands, I believe, as her only century. She and I rode south from Nisbet Park in Loveland and then doubled back to get the 13.13 miles she wanted. I erred a bit and we ended up with 13.18. Then I rode north on an out-and-back to end my day with 44.2 total miles. There are a few interesting sites along the trail, perhaps most interesting of which is the Peters Cartridge Company. Remediation was completed last year, opening the door for adaptive reuse and development into retail and condos. That would be amazing. This story in the Cincinnati Enquirer has a good overview.
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